Close cookie details

This site uses cookies. Learn more about cookies.

OverDrive would like to use cookies to store information on your computer to improve your user experience at our Website. One of the cookies we use is critical for certain aspects of the site to operate and has already been set. You may delete and block all cookies from this site, but this could affect certain features or services of the site. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, click here to see our Privacy Policy.

If you do not wish to continue, please click here to exit this site.

Hide notification

  Main Nav
The Art of Logic in an Illogical World
Cover of The Art of Logic in an Illogical World
The Art of Logic in an Illogical World
Borrow Borrow

How both logical and emotional reasoning can help us live better in our post-truth world
In a world where fake news stories change election outcomes, has rationality become futile? In The Art of Logic in an Illogical World, Eugenia Cheng throws a lifeline to readers drowning in the illogic of the modern world. Cheng is a mathematician, so she knows how to make an airtight argument. But even for her, logic sometimes falls prey to emotion, which is why she still fears flying and eats more cookies than she should. If a mathematician can't be logical, what are we to do? In this book, Cheng reveals the inner workings and limitations of logic, and explains why alogic—for example, emotion—is vital to how we think and communicate. Cheng shows us how to use logic and alogic together to navigate a world awash in bigotry, mansplaining, and manipulative memes. Insightful, useful, and funny, this essential book is for anyone who wants to think more clearly.

How both logical and emotional reasoning can help us live better in our post-truth world
In a world where fake news stories change election outcomes, has rationality become futile? In The Art of Logic in an Illogical World, Eugenia Cheng throws a lifeline to readers drowning in the illogic of the modern world. Cheng is a mathematician, so she knows how to make an airtight argument. But even for her, logic sometimes falls prey to emotion, which is why she still fears flying and eats more cookies than she should. If a mathematician can't be logical, what are we to do? In this book, Cheng reveals the inner workings and limitations of logic, and explains why alogic—for example, emotion—is vital to how we think and communicate. Cheng shows us how to use logic and alogic together to navigate a world awash in bigotry, mansplaining, and manipulative memes. Insightful, useful, and funny, this essential book is for anyone who wants to think more clearly.

Available formats-
  • OverDrive Read
  • EPUB eBook
Languages:-
Copies-
  • Available:
    1
  • Library copies:
    1
Levels-
  • ATOS:
  • Lexile:
  • Interest Level:
  • Text Difficulty:

Recommended for you

About the Author-
  • Eugenia Cheng is the scientist in residence at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and an Honorary Fellow at the University of Sheffield. The author of How to Bake Pi and Beyond Infinity, she lives in Chicago, Illinois.

Reviews-
  • Publisher's Weekly

    June 11, 2018
    Mathematician Cheng (Beyond Infinity) considers how the principles of math can be used to help define one’s personal ethos and bridge the gap between differing points of view. She explores real-life ethical and philosophical problems, like white privilege, “arbitrary standards” in education, and racially-motivated police brutality, through the lens of data-driven logical precepts and mathematical techniques. These include proofs, Venn diagrams, truth tables, flow charts, fractal trees, and more. Using these methods, Cheng argues, can help people avoid mistakes in logical thinking and recognize fallacies. However, she posits that there is more to having a constructive conversation than logic alone, stating that “we should look to engaging people’s emotions to convince them of logical arguments.” Discussing thorny issues, she says, requires a sense of “nuance,” rather than the “false promise of black and white clarity,” and a more intuitive and feelings-based approach. Cheng is largely successful in making mathematical principles and formulas accessible to a lay audience, though the occasional statement—such as “it is the contrapositive of the converse so is equivalent to the converse”—will be challenging for those unfamiliar with math jargon. Cheng’s suggestion to combine the persuasive powers of logic with emotional appeal to find common ground is original and pragmatic, particularly in these divisive times. Agent: George Lucas, InkWell Management.

  • Kirkus

    July 15, 2018
    Logic helps people build bridges to understanding. But what if people don't want those bridges? Aha, says this entertaining guide: There's a meta-problem for you....In our current landscape of the postfactual, the loudest bellower is king. Enter Cheng (Beyond Infinity: An Expedition to the Outer Limits of Mathematics, 2017, etc.), the scientist in residence at the Art Institute of Chicago--now there's a good idea--and possessor of a formidable, mathematically inclined mind. Though the author aims to teach math, science, and formal logic as she progresses, she really means to help readers construct better arguments, which may turn out to be a world-saving proposition. There is a built-in advantage to using logic, she writes, in that it provides a framework for discovering what is true, and "one of the main reasons to have a clear framework for accessing truth is to be able to agree about things." The notion of agreement will come into play late in the book, when Cheng analyzes the best kinds of arguments, which allow us to understand another person's point of view. Until that point, there are theorems, axioms, and proofs to go through, for mathematically based logic hinges on such things as the union of sets (the place where two circles meet in a Venn diagram) and the proper application of analogy to any particular problem. The author isn't exactly playful, but she pitches a few paradoxes as she moves along--one of them being the fact that, since logic doesn't actually correspond to what we know as the real world, we have to "forget the pesky details that prevent things from behaving logically." In other words, we have to think abstractly, which poses plenty of other challenges.Though full of pauses, second glances, and head-scratches, this is a very welcome primer in logical thinking.

    COPYRIGHT(2018) Kirkus Reviews, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

  • Library Journal

    November 1, 2018

    At the heart of mathematics is the proof{amp}mdash;a logical argument from an agreed-upon set of axioms to reach some conclusion. In the real world few things are that simple. In her latest work, mathematician Cheng (Beyond Infinity), using current areas of disagreement from political to social, explains how logical arguments should be constructed and why they frequently fail. These include some cases in which a statement does not necessarily follow logically from the one before but still manages to fail in a different way. For example, people may have similar yet different or unspoken sets of basic assumptions. Other disagreements may arise from unclear generalizations, false equivalencies, or faulty analogies. In clear and easy-to-read prose, Cheng walks readers through simple logic, the limitations of the law of the excluded middle, handling gray areas, and even a little about logical paradoxes. VERDICT This well-written, accessible book offers insight into other people's positions and may even help us find the flaws in our own reasoning.{amp}mdash;Harold D. Shane, Mathematics Emeritus, Baruch Coll. Lib., CUNY

    Copyright 2018 Library Journal, LLC Used with permission.

Title Information+
  • Publisher
    Basic Books
  • OverDrive Read
    Release date:
  • EPUB eBook
    Release date:
Digital Rights Information+
  • Copyright Protection (DRM) required by the Publisher may be applied to this title to limit or prohibit printing or copying. File sharing or redistribution is prohibited. Your rights to access this material expire at the end of the lending period. Please see Important Notice about Copyrighted Materials for terms applicable to this content.

Status bar:

You've reached your checkout limit.

Visit your Checkouts page to manage your titles.

Close

You already have this title checked out.

Want to go to your Checkouts?

Close

Recommendation Limit Reached.

You've reached the maximum number of titles you can recommend at this time. You can recommend up to 5 titles every 1 day(s).

Close

Sign in to recommend this title.

Recommend your library consider adding this title to the Digital Collection.

Close

Enhanced Details

Close
Close

Limited availability

Availability can change throughout the month based on the library's budget.

is available for days.

Once playback starts, you have hours to view the title.

Close

Permissions

Close

The OverDrive Read format of this eBook has professional narration that plays while you read in your browser. Learn more here.

Close

Holds

Total holds:


Close

Restricted

Some format options have been disabled. You may see additional download options outside of this network.

Close

You've reached your library's checkout limit for digital titles.

To make room for more checkouts, you may be able to return titles from your Checkouts page.

Close

Excessive Checkout Limit Reached.

There have been too many titles checked out and returned by your account within a short period of time.

Try again in several days. If you are still not able to check out titles after 7 days, please contact Support.

Close

You have already checked out this title. To access it, return to your Checkouts page.

Close

This title is not available for your card type. If you think this is an error contact support.

Close

An unexpected error has occurred.

If this problem persists, please contact support.

Close

Close

NOTE: Barnes and Noble® may change this list of devices at any time.

Close
Buy it now
and help our library WIN!
The Art of Logic in an Illogical World
The Art of Logic in an Illogical World
Eugenia Cheng
Choose a retail partner below to buy this title for yourself.
A portion of this purchase goes to support your library.
Close
Close

There are no copies of this issue left to borrow. Please try to borrow this title again when a new issue is released.

Close
Barnes & Noble Sign In |   Sign In

You will be prompted to sign into your library account on the next page.

If this is your first time selecting “Send to NOOK,” you will then be taken to a Barnes & Noble page to sign into (or create) your NOOK account. You should only have to sign into your NOOK account once to link it to your library account. After this one-time step, periodicals will be automatically sent to your NOOK account when you select "Send to NOOK."

The first time you select “Send to NOOK,” you will be taken to a Barnes & Noble page to sign into (or create) your NOOK account. You should only have to sign into your NOOK account once to link it to your library account. After this one-time step, periodicals will be automatically sent to your NOOK account when you select "Send to NOOK."

You can read periodicals on any NOOK tablet or in the free NOOK reading app for iOS, Android or Windows 8.

Accept to ContinueCancel